Im dating someone hiv positive

I continue to appreciate the POZ News Desk articles, but am especially grateful that you gave me the opportunity to meet the love of my life. We may hear wedding bells in the near future."—Tonya "Thanks to POZ, finally found my soulmate.....

you too can, don't give up."—Merci "I put an ad on POZ Personals and within a few days I met a wonderful guy who only lives a few miles from me.

In response to your question, it is possible for you and your girlfriend to have a baby without you catching HIV.

Being on treatment and having an undetectable viral load dramatically reduces the chance of your girlfriend passing HIV onto you.

We are both happy as can be and it is really great with us both being positive and understanding the side effects and other issues that we have to put up with."—Ron "I just wanted to let you know how much I love POZ magazine and POZ Personals.

As someone employed by the Minnesota AIDS Project it has definitely been a great resource for news and the personals have really helped me feel less alone.

This includes, for example, someone you have sex with or share a needle with. (The rules vary from state to state, and there are a few federal regulations, too.) Aside from that, "Whether you disclose your status to anyone or not is your choice," Anthony says.

"Tell the people that you think really care." "Especially with your family and friends, it shouldn't be a secret," Anderson says, because hiding the fact that you're HIV-positive from those who love you is a way of buying into the idea that it's something to be ashamed of.

(While the popularity of these sites speak for themselves, there are a number of precautions one should always take in an online dating environment.)​​Dating in real life, of course, doesn't afford such shortcuts.

"You own your narratives; you own your body." "Disclosure is a case-by-case situation," says Kevin V.

Anderson, community outreach and education coordinator at AIDS Foundation Houston.

"It looks different to someone you're dating over family and friends." It's been different every time for Ken Williams.

"Having lived a public life with my diagnosis since 2011, I still get jitters before disclosing to someone," he says.