Adolecent dating research

A longitudinal analysis in which partners’ grades predict respondents’ grades reported at the second interview (controlling for wave one grades and the other covariates) lends support to this view.We also explore the role of age, gender and race/ethnicity as affecting the nature of these relationships.The aims of this study were to: (1) investigate how African American adolescent girls characterize healthy relationships; and (2) describe the meanings of these characteristics in the context of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) 12 healthy dating relationship qualities.Parent and peer influences on academic achievement are well documented, but little research has examined links to romantic involvement during the adolescent period.Two hundred and ninety-one ninth graders of mixed race and gender participated in a five-session healthy relationships program that had been adapted to address concerns of cultural relevance.

To begin to address this gap, this project assessed the effectiveness of a school-based, peer-facilitated healthy relationships program among academically at-risk students.

Results support the value of developing culturally responsive curricula and using peer-facilitated programming to address teenage dating violence in school-based healthy relationship programs.

The goal of this study was to investigate the views of school staff, early adolescents, and parents about which behaviors constitute bullying or teen dating violence (TDV), with attention focused on perceived overlap between the two. more The goal of this study was to investigate the views of school staff, early adolescents, and parents about which behaviors constitute bullying or teen dating violence (TDV), with attention focused on perceived overlap between the two.

Finally, we draw on the content of in-depth interviews elicited from a subset of the respondents to illustrate both types of mechanisms (selection vs. These results underscore the importance of continuing to explore the role of romantic partners in connection with a broad range of prosocial as well as problem adolescent outcomes.

This research was supported by a grant from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (HD36223), and by the Center for Family and Demographic Research at Bowling Green State University, which has core funding from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (HD042831-01).